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Five questions for Nils Mösko

Nils Mösko on strategy, expanding to new markets, and partnerships.

Eventually, everyone will be electric, so you need to differentiate yourself somewhat.

How does the reality of your job compare with what people think you do?

In my line of work, you try to define strategy and ask relevant questions, like where we should expand our presence and how. And how to succeed at it. Should we do it ourselves, or should we collaborate with local partners? I think that's basically what we're trying to structure. On the other hand, through collaboration, partnerships, alliances, we try to do a lot of new things there, whether it's on the charging front or the technology side of things.

Another part of my work is figuring out our business model. What's our operating model? And how can we be optimised? How can we make sure that our business model fulfils the promises we make to our customers while upholding the efficiency of our sales? There, we need to be much braver and faster. For example, we can try to do a pilot and test it. Then, if we are wrong (and we will be often wrong), we just need to adjust it and keep going.

The other part is market expansion: where we're trying to think about, which markets should we go to, when, and how to do that. Then we really must run the project until everything is ready, and then we hand over the keys to the sales team. 

Those are the big areas. I think most people think my job is fun, and I think they're right. I think that it's one of the most fun jobs you can have. When you talk about strategy, you get to look at new things and you also get to implement them. I think people often understand what I do, and I never have to explain what it is I do at a party, for example. The only thing I can say is that our department is much more hands on than some people think.

What do you most enjoy about your job?

I really like the cross-functional nature and the combination of externally/internally directed work. I can contribute to driving this company further and really grow it to what it deserves to be, and that is fun. With expansion, partnerships come around and we can cooperate, which I also enjoy.

What job would you like to have, if you didn't have this one?

If I hadn't gone into business, I would’ve become a paediatrician. I was accepted into medical school, but I made my choice. Sometimes, to be honest, I think to myself: why did I choose business? Being a paediatrician could have had a bit more purpose I suppose, but there you go.

What are the trends that are currently shaping your area of work?

If you look a couple of years back, the big topics were shared mobility and autonomous driving. Now that has flipped completely. Right now, it's electric mobility first. Everyone sees shared mobility as something that has no money in it. It is a challenge to make profit with it and there are only a couple of small cases. Autonomous driving is pushed out, things have changed, and we're at the forefront. Eventually, everyone will be electric, so you need to differentiate yourself somewhat. I think we have the sustainability topic which is really important, and can be a differentiator because we wholeheartedly believe in it. We're working on it and we're improving it, but we are already there, and I think that is a big difference. 

What is your favourite invention?

Noise-cancelling headphones. Especially while working from home during the past year. They came in handy a lot, especially since I have two kids.

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